‘Zoe Dare vs. the Disasteroid’ Checks All the Boxes

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Image: Action Lab Entertainment
Image: Action Lab Entertainment

Physically and mentally strong heroine? Check.

Witty geeky techie sidekick sister? Check.

Nerdy government official kind of reminiscent of Phil Coulson? Check.

Testoterone-infused cocky foil? Check.

Family mystery over dead father (whose spirit talks to heroine)? Check.

With all of these semi-stereotypical characters, you’d think that Zoe Dare vs. the Disasteroid would be trite and boring. However, the story is oddly fresh and interesting due primarily to Brockton McKinney’s sharp writing and Andrew Herman’s stylized art.

Ostensibly, Zoe is the heroine of the tale. The government approaches Zoe to help shield the planet from an asteroid, nicknamed The Disasteroid by her spunky, punky, geeky sister. It’s the sister, Danni, however, that I loved the most. Her purple mohawk hairstyle and her punk rock style combines with a deep sense of the pop culture and tech geek, making her a perfectly rounded-out character.

The dialogue is sharp and quick, reminiscent of a Whedonesque style. The plot may appear to be a pastiche of other less nuanced comic book style stories; however, it does a good job of combining these elements to make the story feel fresh and new. We know that the hyper-masculinized character is going to be a foil to our heroine, but Zoe uses her influence and social power to take control of the situation.

Image: Action Lab Entertainment
Image: Action Lab Entertainment

The art is as colorful as the dialogue. Bright, rich colors stand out throughout the book. Herman utilizes close-up views that create drama. He also overlays traditional block frames over a larger image to give a sense of motion and drama.

For a first issue, Zoe Dare vs. the Disasteroid is a fun romp with some strong writing. A definite “must read.”

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