That Moment Your Wedding Photos Look Ridiculously Dated

The Happy Couple, Image: Nicole Wakelin
The Happy Couple, Image: Nicole Wakelin

How did I reach a point where I now roll my eyes at my own wedding pictures? It could have something to do with being married for 22 years which leaves a lot of room for fashions to change, but it’s not like I’m 80. It wasn’t that long ago!

Still, when I celebrated my 22nd anniversary last week and put my standard wedding picture on Facebook and Twitter for all my friends to see, I was struck by just how dated it looks today. I had a perm. I had puffy sleeves. And I have no explanation at all for my husband’s hair. What a couple of nerds!

Actually, I do have an explanation. It was his worst haircut ever. He knows it. I know it. His Mom refused to buy any photos where he was looking straight at the camera because it was so noticeable. Honestly, at the time I was hardly aware of it in the rush of the wedding day. He got it cut just the day before, so it wasn’t until we were on our honeymoon that I looked at him and thought, “What the heck did you do to your hair?”

My Husband and The Best Man, Image: Nicole Wakelin
My Husband and The Best Man, Image: Nicole Wakelin

Russ is sporting a bad haircut, but at least he’s not dated. Crooked is crooked no matter the decade and the barber is more to blame than my husband. I also blame my brother-in-law, John, because what kind of Best Man doesn’t immediately see that and make the Groom march right back into the nearest barber shop? Also, John is totally bald now so I guess that’s payback.

My husband is wearing a pretty generic tux which hasn’t changed a heck of a lot over the years. Guys are lucky that way unless you were unfortunate enough to have a formal affair in the ’70s with those ruffled shirts. Those poor guys didn’t stand a chance.

I, however, fully embraced the year 1992 on my wedding day. I swear to God, permed hair was a thing. We thought it looked awesome. One look at my bridesmaids confirms it wasn’t just me. I know, we look laughable today and I don’t know how we fit all that hair in the limo, but it was a thing, people!

See, the hair was a thing! Image: Nicole Wakelin
See, the hair was a thing! Image: Nicole Wakelin

Also, puffy sleeves. The world was fresh out of the Big ’80s and those sleeves were cool. I was all princess-y with my puffy sleeves and permed hair and just shut up and let me have my moment. I think of them as Snow White sleeves, so, yeah, a Disney nerd even on my wedding day.

It’s been 22 years and fashion has thankfully moved on from perms and puffy sleeves and hopefully that barber has moved on to another career. I look very young, and the photos are very dated, but crooked hair or no, I love my husband even more than I did the day we were married.

But he’s not allowed to pick a barber without my approval. Ever.

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Location

Save the date card commissioned from Matt Schubbe.
Save the date card commissioned from Matt Schubbe.

If you are not getting married in a church, picking a location for the ceremony and reception can be difficult. However, the location was the only thing about our wedding that was not a difficult decision. Andrew and I had the wedding and reception at a beautiful, Tutor-style mansion, bed and breakfast called The Quamichan Inn.

I’m not sure I can say enough about the awesome that is The Quamichan Inn. Getting married at The Quamichan Inn was the only thing that was not negotiable. People often asked, “Why did you choose this location?” The only answer I could give was, “Because it is my favorite location in the Cowichan Valley.”

Everything from price, to service, to location, to atmosphere and ambiance, to food, to comfort was, in a word, perfection.

The back of The Quamichan Inn. Photo by Patrick Fisher. Used with permission.
The back of The Quamichan Inn. Photo by Patrick Fisher. Used with permission.

We had the ceremony in their beautiful gardens and had the reception indoors in the room dedicated to conferences, meetings, and receptions.

Andrew and I decided to rent all of the rooms from the Friday before the wedding to the Sunday after. Plus, we rented our suite—the Quamichan suite—and one more room until the Monday following the wedding. We didn’t have to worry about settling our bill for the weekend, which included the rooms, all the food and alcohol, minus the $500.00 deposit, until it was time to check out. A lot of places require that you pay for the food and alcohol before hand, based on the number of guests who RSVP’d. However, because of a combination of the small party and the number of services used, The Quamichan Inn didn’t create a bill until afterwards, and only charged us for those who actually attended, instead of the anticipated numbers. We still had to give them anticipated numbers so they could shop and prepare accordingly, but it was one less bill to worry about leading up to the event.

Even though we live in the same town as The Quamichan Inn, staying at the location of the wedding and ceremony meant that all we had to do on the big day was get up, eat the breakfast that was prepared for us, get dressed, and show up by walking down stairs. We also didn’t have to worry about how much we drank the night of, because all we had to do was walk upstairs to eventually go to sleep. Everything else was done for us by the amazing staff at the bed and breakfast.

Considering I only managed one hour of sleep the night before the wedding, and two hours the night of the wedding, staying on location without any added worries was an even bigger benefit than anticipated.

The three rooms that were not occupied by Andrew and I, and my boys, were used by out-of-town guests. The Quamichan Inn wasn’t big enough to accommodate all of our out-of-town guests, as they made up the majority of our guest list. But, renting the entire bed and breakfast for the weekend meant that the guests who were staying at hotels just down the road were free to come and go at any time during the weekend. The Quamichan Inn became our home, but without the worry of having to clean up after entertaining our guests.

We didn’t have to do any set-up or take-down. We didn’t have to worry about hiring a catering and wait staff, or a bartender. Guests didn’t have to pre-select their meal choices. Andrew and I pre-selected the soup, salad, and dessert. Guests chose one of three mains when it was time to sit down for dinner.

Getting married under a "Make it so" pennant banner. Banner made by Jules Sherred. Photo by Jules Sherred.
Getting married under a “Make it so” pennant banner. Banner made by Jules Sherred. Photo by Jules Sherred.

All people had to do was show up and have a good time.

And what a good time it was. Even the staff got into the fun. They couldn’t stop talking about it, even after it was all over. The head waiter, Daniel, was absolutely superb. We had one waitress who was excited beyond words when she learned she would be on service the day and night of our wedding. She even squee’d when we told her, after she asked if it was okay, that she was welcome to wear a costume, too. After that conversation took place on the Friday night, my youngest, in bewilderment, asked, “Did that just really happen?”

At first, we were concerned that there would be an issue with a bunch of people running around in costume the day of the wedding. But, as soon as we told The Quamichan Inn’s coordinator, Colleen, what we had planned for our day, the entire staff at the inn started to bustle with enthusiasm. The chef, Steven, who is also a geek, asked if it was okay to create a sci-fi themed menu. We obviously said, “yes,” and forgave the typo on the menu because everyone was so excited about our day.

The menu. Photo by Jules Sherred.
The menu. Photo by Jules Sherred.

Even people who came in for dinner on the Friday night, after learning about our wedding because the staff couldn’t stop talking about it, asked if it was okay to drive by the day of and take a look at all of our costumes.

Another thing the staff did was come in early on Saturday to open the bar early. We served the hors d’oeuvres at 2 p.m.—an hour before the ceremony—which amounted to a late launch. Some guests started to consume their alcohol then. We had a mix of a cash bar and provided a half of a liter of wine for each guest who was drinking. Then, at last call, we ordered another four liters of wine for guests. When we woke up the next morning, we still had two liters remaining.

The food was to die for. I was worried that I didn’t order enough hors d’oeuvres, but I was wrong. There was plenty left over. When it was time for the ceremony, the staff put the leftovers in the fridge. Then brought them back out to help people sober up (with plenty of free coffee) once the evening’s entertainment was over, and the guests were mingling.

The dinner, again, perfection. Huge portions. Delicious. Served with precision timing.

Talking about money and costs in public is not good manners. All I can say is that between the amount of food we received for the price charged, and the beyond amazing service, which started when I booked The Quamichan Inn last year, I feel like I ripped off the location, even after paying the tip.

The staff at The Quamichan Inn made everyone feel like they were in their own homes, and helped to make our wedding weekend celebrations better than we could have possibly imagined. There are no words to express just how amazing they were.

The set table. Photo by Jules Sherred.
The set table. Photo by Jules Sherred.

I cannot recommend enough going the bed and breakfast route, if it is available to you. Weddings and receptions are stressful enough as it is. If you can find a location that does it all for one price, it is one less thing to stress out about. If you live anywhere near The Quamichan Inn, meaning anywhere on Vancouver Island or the lower mainland, definitely consider getting married and having your reception there. You will not regret it.

Still to come in this series over the next few months:

  • Gifts
  • Things we’ve learned, and other miscellaneous things we did.

You can read Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: Last Names and Culture here. You can download the first six previous posts in this series, in either PDF, ePUB, or MOBI, here. These parts include: Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: Introduction; Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Proposal and the Rings; Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Outfits and Wedding Attire; Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Wedding Party, Family, and Guests; Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Ceremony; and Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Reception.

If you would like to see a post about something not already mentioned, I want to know. Tell me, what has you curious? About what would you like to see me write? If you let me know, I will try my best to include it in a post.

Finally, if you got married outside of a church, what about your location made it special?

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: Last Names and Culture

Save the date card commissioned from Matt Schubbe.

There are many differences between marriages in the United States and Canada. I explored some of these differences in an earlier post about the ceremony. The change of last name after marriage is another one of those differences.

In Canada, the rules around this are relatively simple. At least, in my mind. One of the reasons this post is so far overdue is that the United States has 50 states, each with their own rules about such things. In some states, the bride simply has to check a box when signing the marriage registry and her last name is changed. In other states, the bride has to notify difference agencies in order to change her last name. In only a handful of states, it is legal for the groom to take the bride’s name. I’m not even sure what the rules are in the states that allow same-sex marriage. Trying to research the rules in the United States surrounding this left me a little bit weary in the brain.

But, what I do know, or at least what I have been lead to believe, is that in the United States it is considered a legal name. In Canada, that is not the situation. Because of Canada’s views on multiculturalism, and there are many Canadians who come from countries where it is not the norm for the bride to assume the groom’s last name, the act of changing your last name is one of culture and not law.

When two people get married in Canada, either spouse is allowed to assume the last name of their partner. It doesn’t matter if it is a same-sex marriage or an opposite-sex marriage. But, that is all it is. It is a legal alias, one that can only be used if not intended for the purposes of fraud. In fact, up until recently, you had to have your spouse’s permission to use their last name on your passport. Of course, with the exception of Quebec, where you are not allowed to use your spouse’s last name for any reason whatsoever. Also, Quebec does not recognize common-law partnerships.

Some people decide to assume their spouse’s last name in the workplace and add the legal alias on their bank account, which requires proof of marriage, but keep their identification under their birth name because it is both expensive and time consuming to change these things. There are only a couple of provinces that do not charge to change identification after marriage.

Also, because Canada has common-law marriage laws, in some situations you don’t have to be legally married to assume your partner’s last name. Recently, passport laws have been changed to make it easier for both legally married partners and common-law partners to use each other’s last name on their passports. Spouses are no longer required to get permission for use of last name and common-law partners are now allowed to have a passport issued using their partner’s last name with a letter attesting to the fact they’ve been living in a marriage-like relationship for at least 12 months.

In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, they have a common-law marriage registry. If your common-law relationship is registered with the province, you are allowed to assume your partner’s last name for the purposes of a driver’s license, healthcare card, and other provincially issued identifications.

In all provinces except for Quebec and British Columbia, you are allowed to create a double-barrelled last name comprised of two parts, either hyphenated or not. Unlike some South American countries, it does not matter in which order the last names are places. In Quebec, there is no way around this law. In British Columbia, you have to undergo a legal change of name in order to use a double-barrelled last name.

The process in British Columbia is very simple. When I changed my first and middle names, it took less than two weeks for Vital Statistics to process the change, even though the website says four to six weeks. However, undergoing a legal change of name in Canada is not something you do lightly. If you do decide to legally change your name, for all intents and purposes, you are going through a rebirth. Your original birth records are destroyed and new ones are created in your new name. Then you are issued a new birth certificate, not an amended one, reflecting the new name.

I changed names because I’m a trans man, and for my marriage to be legal the officiant has to use the names on my birth certificate, and I couldn’t get married with a feminine first name. In this case, there aren’t too many ramifications involved in making this decision.

Because of how our name laws work, if you want to legally change your last name after marriage, one really needs to think about that. Why? Because in Canada, upon getting married, you can either use your last name at birth, assume your current spouse’s last name, or assume the last name from any other marriage. You are allowed to go back and forth between your legal name and any other alias at any time, as long as you are not intending to do fraud. This means that once I am married, there are three last names both Andrew and I are allowed to use, as we have both been previously married. But, if you go through the process of legally changing your last name, you cannot just simply go back to the last name with which you were born. If you got divorced and wanted to go back to your last name at birth, then you would have to once again go through the legal name change process, paying all of the fees involved, and spending a lot of time updating your identification, bank records, employment records, etc.

Even though it took less than two weeks for my legal name change to be processed way back in April, two months and hundreds of dollars later, I have only now received the last of my new identifications.

Many times when talking with my American pals about my name change and a handful of my Canadian pals who were unaware of our laws, they assumed that I was referring to changing my last name. I was actually changing my first and middle names, a process with laws no less conflicting between provinces. In British Columbia, it doesn’t require going to court, or placing adverts in the paper declaring intent because doing so places people in jeopardy. It really is as simple as filling out a form and having the Royal Canadian Mounted Police do a criminal record check so that any record that may exist will follow to the new name. Other provinces have different procedures, so confusion around all of these things is very understandable, especially from a cultural point of view.

In case you are curious, I will not be assuming Andrew’s last name after we are married. I’m very attached to my last name. Andrew has somewhat suggested that he would be willing to adopt my last name, but I think that would sound funny. Also, for those curious about what middle name I ended up choosing, I went with Coniah.

Still to come in this series over the next few months—I will finish the series after the wedding:

  • The location
  • Gifts
  • Things we’ve learned, and other miscellaneous things we did.

You can download all six previous posts in this series, in either PDF, ePUB, or MOBI, here. These parts include: Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: Introduction; Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Proposal and the Rings; Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Outfits and Wedding Attire; Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Wedding Party, Family, and Guests; Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Ceremony; and Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Reception.

If you would like to see a post about something not already mentioned, I want to know. Tell me, what has you curious? About what would you like to see me write? If you let me know, I will try my best to include it in a post.

Finally, if you are an American, what is the procedure for changing the last name in your state? Please let me know in what state you live. That would be very helpful. If you live outside of Canada and the United States, what are the laws where you live?

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding Reintroduction

Jules and Andrew Save the Date-01
Imaged commissioned from Matt Schubbe

With just over three months until the big day, and with GeekMom moving to a new home, I thought now would be an excellent time to reintroduce my geeky-queer wedding planning series to existing GeekMom readers, while giving new readers an opportunity to easily catch-up with the series.

What happens when two previously married people — one a trans man from Canada with two teenage children, the other a pansexual from the United States with no children, both geeks — decide to get married?

For your convenience, I’ve turned each of the previous six posts in this series into downloadable files — PDF, ePUB, and MOBI, all DRM-free.

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: Introduction is the first post in this series. In the introduction, you’ll get a little taste of the many things my partner and I have been learning as we began this next chapter in our lives.

Download the PDF, ePUB, or MOBI version of Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: Introduction.

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Proposal and the Rings is the second post in this series. Because of the nature of our relationship, people often wonder, “So, who did the proposing and how?” The answer is no-one. In fact, had he proposed, automatically my answer would have been, “No.” You now may be wondering, “Wait, so how are you engaged?” You may also be curious as to why I would have said no, had he asked. The answer to these questions, and more, is very long and complicated, and is found in this post.

Download the PDF, ePUB, or MOBI version of Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Proposal and the Rings.

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Outfits and Wedding Attire is the third post in this series. The most difficult decision Andrew and I faced when planning our wedding was answering the question, “What are we going to wear?” In the end, we decided to have a United Federation of Planets wedding. What that means and entails is found in this post.

Download the PDF, ePUB, or MOBI version of Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Outfits and Wedding Attire.

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Wedding Party, Family, and Guests is the fourth post in this series. When you are planning a wedding, tradition and etiquette will tell you there are many things you must do. You must select a wedding party. Traditionally, there are also rules about whom you should choose. Traditionally, the parents of the individuals getting married must assume certain responsibilities. The guests are also seen to have specific roles within the whole affair. But, what if both parties have already been once married and divorced? What if one of those individuals is a trans man? What if the people getting married have different cultural backgrounds? What if a geeky element is being added? These questions are only a small fraction of things Andrew and I had to sort out as we began to plan our geeky-queer wedding. Our solutions — including the possibility of the kal-if-fee — are found in this post.

Download the PDFePUB, or MOBI version of Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Wedding Party, Family, and Guests.

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Ceremony is the fifth post in this series.In this latest geeky-queer wedding post, I explore the ceremony, including vows and legalities; the type of ceremony we will be having; and the process of going through a legal name change, and the reasons behind that need.

Download the PDFePUB, or MOBI version of Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Ceremony.

Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Reception is the sixth post in this series. When planning our geeky-queer wedding, Andrew and I had to make up a lot of things along the way, while balancing some of the traditional aspects that we find appealing. Sometimes, creating a new guide for our circumstances has been a little difficult. Other times, it was as easy as figuring out what aspects we really do not like in traditional weddings, and simply eliminating them; sometimes replacing them with our own special touches. The reception is another one of those situations where the end result is due to a process of elimination and supplementation, balanced with a couple traditional elements.

Download the PDFePUB, or MOBI version of Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: The Reception.

If you’d prefer to download these posts as one file, you can download Planning My Geeky-Queer Wedding: Parts One – Six as a PDF, ePUB, or MOBI.

Still to come in this series over the next three months:

  • Last names and culture
  • The location
  • Gifts
  • Things we’ve learned, and other miscellaneous things we did or are doing.

If you would like to see a post about something not already mentioned, I want to know. Tell me, what has you curious? About what would you like to see me write? If you let me know, I will try my best to include it in a post.

Finally, did you do anything unique or out of the ordinary for your wedding and/or reception?

A Wedding and Honeymoon for Movie Geeks

 

Our picturesque David Lynch honeymoon location. Photo: Amy Kraft

There are a lot of areas of entertainment where my husband and I don’t always share the same taste, but we both tend to geek out over the same directors. Around the time of our wedding we were geeking out about a couple directors in particular, which influence our Wes Anderson wedding and David Lynch honeymoon.

Futura was the only font considered for our wedding invitations. Thank you, Wes Anderson (and to a lesser extent, Stanley Kubrick).

For the wedding, I didn’t go so far as to wear a Margot Tenenbaum stripped polo wedding dress (though if I had Gwenyth Paltrow’s figure and raccoon makeup, I might have considered it). No, but Wes Anderson was in the details. The font on all of our wedding invitations and correspondence? Futura, of course, with last names in all caps. The soundracks played a big role, too. I walked down the aisle to “Mothersbaugh’s Canon” from The Royal Tenenbaums, and we walked back out to “Concrete and Clay” from the Rushmore soundtrack.

For the honeymoon, you probably agree that no two words convey more romance than Twin Peaks. When my husband showed me the luxury lodge whose exterior was used as The Great Northern, the Salish Lodge was the only place on my honeymoon list (it’s heavenly, by the way). It didn’t hurt matters that it’s situated atop the waterfall in Twin Peak’s opening, and it’s a short drive from where you can get a slice of Agent Cooper’s cherry pie. “Diane, if you’re ever up here, you’ve gotta try this pie.”

One Tuesday morning, we went exploring down to the bottom of the waterfall. While we didn’t find any ears or men in yellow suits or dead girls wrapped in plastic, there, at the bottom of the waterfall we found… Trey Parker and Matt Stone. Seriously. They were there with a small film crew, and months later while watching Comedy Central we saw a promo with the pair and the waterfall in the background. Geek honeymoon, complete.

If you’re planning a wedding, I highly recommend taking things that you both love, and weaving the details into your big day. Then later, watching the movie or TV show or listening to soundtracks will always make you smile. Though if we had to do it all over again, maybe we’d do a Big Lebowski wedding. With green nail polish and everything. I’d rock the Viking horns.

Anyone else have any such romantic suggestions for weddings and honeymoons?

My Ren Faire-Themed Wedding

My husband and I outside our wedding reception (Image: Mandy Horetski)

There are many geeky themes you could have for your wedding. Ren Faire was the theme my husband and I chose for our wedding, which was nearly 5 years ago.

My husband, Todd, and I had been dating for nearly two years when he proposed to me on my birthday. Once the euphoria of being newly engaged wore off, we got down to planning.

I always knew I wanted a wedding in the Fall, but I also wanted some sort of theme to express who we were. I was trying to think of a theme, when Todd suggested a Ren Faire theme.

I thought it was a great idea, but I wanted a traditional wedding dress so we explained our theme as ‘Ren Faire without the costumes’. I did get myself and my attendants cloaks to wear at the reception along with a crown and royal cloak for Todd. This allowed us to enter our reception as the King and Queen.

Since we got married at the end of September, I wanted to try an incorporate Autumn into our theme as well. I got fake pumpkins that you can carve  and carved out castles and axes to match our theme. I also made our favors, which were little chocolate castles in our wedding colors of green and purple.

A Royal Cake (Image: Mandy Horetski)

I also made felt banners for the walls of our reception hall with dragons and castles on them. Todd actually helped a lot with those since I can’t cut very straight.

The best part of our reception was our cake. I really wanted a Castle cake, but most bakers don’t make them. A relative recommended a cake shop and they had castle cakes! It looked really good and it tasted wonderful as well.

Our wedding was very lovely and we got a lot of compliments on the decor. It was a lot of work since most of it was ‘do it yourself’ but it turned out very well.

Finally! The Breaking Dawn Wedding Preview

I had to wait seven seasons and four movies to finally watch Deanna Troi and Will Riker (Star Trek: The Next Generation) tie the knot. Don’t get me wrong, it was well worth the wait, but Twilight fans will not have to wait quite so long to see Edward and Bella wed. Viewers of the MTV awards this weekend were gifted with the release of the trailer for Breaking Dawn (Part one), and now so is the rest of the world.

So did you long for this wedding, or do you share my desire to see the Troi/Riker service on Betazed? Somehow watching the vampire marry the doe eyed girl, reminds me of the attempt of Ming the Merciless to marry Dale Arden in Flash Gordon. Team Jacob all the way!

It’s Wedding Week at GeekMom!

A possible geeky wedding ring from our friends at ThinkGeek.

All this week is Wedding Week here at GeekMom. We will be running posts on the geeky side of weddings, from the music to the theme to geeky elements you can include in your wedding. Please share your geeky wedding stories with us in the comments to any of the wedding-related posts this week!

[If the image has given you any ideas, you can get the Secret Decoder Ring from ThinkGeek.]

Han Solo in Carbonite Cake

Although I’ve posted my share of cake creations to GeekMom, this one comes from my friend Jenn Dorff, who has patiently been my Yoda of buttercream.  She made this epic Han Solo cake for our mutual friend Sami Clark’s wedding.

Han Solo cake

Here’s what Sami had to say about having a carbonite cake:

Drew was wearing a “Han shot first” t-shirt on our first date, and I passed that test with flying colors. 😉;) He’d been (semi?) joking about dressing as Han for the wedding…and then asked if we could use Han as a cake topper. This didn’t really fit with the picture of the big, fancy wedding cake that I had in mind, so I came up with the idea for the groom’s cake on the spot–and he squee’d.

We weren’t terribly surprised to find several previously made Han-in-carbonite cakes online, but I knew that Jenn was going to blow this out of the water!

But just to surprise her new hubby, Sami bought a Han action figure as well as one of Xena in her red dress (Sami wore a beautiful red wedding dress) and added them as cake toppers right before they cut it. They also used “The Throne Room/End Title” piece from Star Wars for the ceremony’s recessional music.

Classical Geeky Wedding Music

Around where I come from (New York) the music for when the bride walks down the aisle is always ‘Bridal Chorus’ from Richard Wagner’s opera Lohengrin, and the music when the new couple runs off is Mendelssohn’s Wedding March from ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream.’ (With maybe a dozen of the exact same exceptions including Bach’s Jesu Joy.)

Not my own, however. I picked a favorite classical piece that I wanted for the middle of the mass, and the choir director switched it and played it at the exit. This is a sore point for me because then I didn’t get to hear it since I was outside shaking hands during the whole thing. (I had a full classical choir at my wedding, and it was this gorgeous a capella piece with six part harmony and…nevermind.) However, it also meant that Mendelssohn wasn’t playing. Yay, for bucking tradition!

Don’t get me wrong. I love Felix Mendelssohn. And Wagner is hilariously dramatic. But why does everyone have to have the same music? What can a geeky couple choose for their classical wedding music? Depends on the mood of your wedding.

Let’s say you want dramatic. For your bride’s walk, you could choose a tune that brings to mind warrior maidens:

And for the couple’s happy trip back down the aisle to dominate the world:

If you like noble, let’s try this. You could even ask someone to do a British Accent saying:

Marriage: the final frontier. This is the voyage of the relationship (INSERT NAMES HERE.) Their continuing mission: to explore each other’s strange habits, to create new life without destroying our civilization, to boldly go where many geeks have gone before.

and the couple can go off into the universe with style:

Perhaps you’re more lighthearted. Here’s a good one to dance up the aisle with:

And the couple can usher people to the party with this:

Those are my geeky picks. Imagine a bride and groom reading this right now and needing help. Did you have some alternative wedding music? Do you have suggestions? Post them below!

Steampunk Wedding Cakes Galore!

Image CC by gruntzooki via Flickr

If you are into steampunk you have to check out the latest posting at Cake Wrecks. Typically, this fearless blogger posts the most horrific cake accidents known to man, but on Sundays she has a day of rest and posts amazingly awesome cake finds. She has scoured the web and found incredibly detailed examples of steampunk wedding cakes as well as examples of steampunk weddings. If you know anyone getting married, share the love.
Sunday Sweets Steams It Up